books

Organised Sexual Abuse is the first book-length research manuscript on the subject of organised abuse.

Organised Sexual Abuse provides a critical overview of research and debates on organised abuse, and draws on the life histories of 21 Australian survivors to examine the experience and impact of organised abuse.

"Organized Sexual Abuse is groundbreaking and courageous. In the face of widespread public disbelief about the reality of childhood sexual abuse and gendered violence, Salter successfully constructs a coherent account of organized sexual abuse that is both theoretically sophisticated and grounded in lived experience—both his own and that of survivors—while resisting the temptation to provide readers with easy reassurance or simple answers that reinforce the status quo. His ethical commitment to taking lived experiences of gendered violence seriously and to being at stake in his writing, while breaking the silence surrounding organized abuse, are admirable and serve as a model for ethical scholarship and academic praxis." Laura Noll, Journal of Trauma and Dissociation

Chapter 6 of my recent book Crime, Justice and Social Media describes the attempts of online activists to disrupt the organised abuse of children in Africa and the United Kingdom. The chapter is called: "From #OpGabon to #OpDeathEaters: Transnational justice flows on social media". 

"This lively, thought provoking book greatly enlarges our understanding of online abuse across various social media platforms. Its lucid combination of critical theory, analytical insight, and interdisciplinary sensibility make it indispensable reading for anyone seeking to know more about this vital aspect of contemporary culture. In particular, its attention to the gendered dynamics and politics of abuse make it a timely, bold and innovative statement of criminology at its very best."
Eamonn Carrabine, Professor of Sociology, University of Essex, UK, and co-editor of Crime, Media, Culture

Book chapters

Salter, M. (2018) Finding a new narrative: Meaningful responses to ‘false memory’ disinformation, in Sinason, V. Memory in Dispute, Karnac: London.

Salter, M. (2018) Child sexual abuse. In Dekeseredy, W. and Dragiewicz, M. (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology, Routledge: London and New York.

Salter, M. (2016) Organised child sexual abuse in the media. In Pontel, H. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Oxford University Press: Oxford and London.

Salter, M. (2008) Out of the shadows: Re-envisioning the debate on ritual abuse. In: Perskin. P. and Noblitt. R. (eds) Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century: Psychological, forensic, social and political considerations. Robert D. Reed: Brandon, OR.


journal articles & papers

Salter, M. (2018) Abuse and cruelty in religious bureaucracy: The case of the Anglican Diocese of Newcastle, Journal of Australian Studies, forthcoming. 

Salter, M. (2017) Doing sustainable trauma research, Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Violence and Exploitation, 2(1).

Salter, M. (2016) Organised abuse into adulthood: Survivor and mental health perspectives, Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, forthcoming.

Salter, M. and Dagistanli, S. (2015) Cultures of abuse: ‘Sex grooming’, organised abuse and race in Rochdale, UK, International Journal of Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 4(2), 50-64.

Salter, M. (2014) Multi-perpetrator domestic violence. Trauma, Violence & Abuse, 15(2), 102 – 112, 1524-8380

Salter, M. (2013). Through a glass, darkly: Representation and power in research on organised abuse. Qualitative Sociology Review, IX(3), 152-166.

Salter, M. (2013). Grace’s story: Prolonged incestuous abuse from childhood into adulthood. Violence Against Women, 19(2), 146-165.

Salter, M. & Richters, J. (2012). Organised abuse: A neglected category of sexual abuse with significant lifetime mental healthcare sequelae. Journal of Mental Health, 21(5), 499-508.

Salter, M. (2012). The role of ritual in the organised abuse of children. Child Abuse Review, 21(6): 440-451.

Salter, M. (2011). Organised abuse and testimonial legitimacy. In Lee, M., Gail, M. & S. Milivojevic (Eds.) Proceedings of the 2010 Critical Criminology Conference. Sydney: University of Sydney and University of Western Sydney.

Salter, M. (2008) Organised abuse and the politics of disbelief. In C. Cunneen and M. Salter (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2008 Critical Criminology Conference, Sydney: Crime and Justice Research Network and the Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Network.


Salter, M., Middleton, W., Dorahy, M. (2017) Dissociative identity disorder exists and is the result of childhood trauma, The Conversation, October 5.

Salter, M. (2017) Attacks on the credibility of abuse survivors are not justified by research, The Guardian, October 2,

Salter, M. (2016) Incest: why is ‘worst of the worst’abuse so often ignored’, Conversation, August 11.

Salter, M. (2015) Why does it take victims of sexual abuse so long to speak up? The Conversation, August 27. 

Salter, M. (2014) Why celebrated males think they are licensed to offend, Sydney Morning Herald, May 31, p 32.

Salter, M. (2014) Woody Allen: presumption of innocence no guarantee of justice in sexual abuse, The Conversation, February 4.

Salter, M. (2014) Philippines webcam child abuse arrests come after decades of exploitation and inequality, The Conversation, January 17.

Salter, M. (2013) Arrests shine light into murky world of child pornography, The Conversation, November 20.

Salter, M. (2013) Sex abuse victims deserve better than media-driven policy. The Conversation, August 14.

Salter, M. (2012) Fighting child sexual exploitation overseas and at home. The Conversation, December 4.

Salter, M. (2012) Rogue priests or a culture of abuse? Investigating paedophilia in the Catholic Church. The Conversation, November 13, available at: 

Salter, M. (2012) Jimmy Savile, Garry Glitter and the politics of paedophile rings. The Conversation, November 2.

Other articles